Top Shadow
Border
 
  Image Courtesy Alex Hoffmann

  Venezuela Caracas

 
Border Shadow
Spacer
Spacer
   Webmaster: Erin Other Languages:    
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Username: Password: Help Type:
Help Remember Me:

Stories: The Opening of Carora (English and español)

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1 -- Add Story

The Opening of Carora (English and español) 19 Feb 2002
Haga cliq aquí para leer en español.

The Opening of Carora
by Salvador Nania
Thanks to Alan Manning for making this story available to the web master, February 17, 2002 .
Translated by Erin Howarth, July 3, 2002


At the end of 1988, President Robert P. Lee (then president of the Venezuela Maracaibo Mission) gave his permission to open to the area of Carora, a town located two hours from Barquisimeto, capital of the state of Lara (five hours from Maracaibo). An enthusiastic group of four missionaries including Elder Ramirez and Elder Monk (Unfortunately, I don’t remember the names of the other two) was chosen by President Lee to initiate the work of the preaching of the Gospel. The first four months were difficult for the missionaries due to the hardness of heart of the inhabitants of Carora. The false traditions mixed with the "advice" from the Catholic priests of not allowing the missionaries to enter, made preaching an uphill struggle.

Even so, in five months they baptized seven people, pioneers of the church in that part of Zion. I do not have many details regarding the way that they accepted the Gospel, but I do know of the conversions during the time that I was branch president. In January of 1989, President Lee gave me the assignment to work as president of the branch of Carora. I was nervous because I had the task of organizing the church as a branch, and I felt that I had little experience, hardly three months in the mission field, but “the Lord giveth no commandments unto the children of men, save he shall prepare a way for them that they may accomplish the thing which he commandeth them”. In addition to the assignment to preside over a branch with my little experience, the president gave me a new missionary to train, just arrived from the United States, Elder Fuller, an enthusiastic young man with very little knowledge of Spanish.

First, I found enormous opposition on the part of the Catholic Church. There were six missionaries, aside from my companion and I. they were Elder Bean, Elder Reyes, Elder Monk (district leader) and Elder Furman. The opposition of the Catholic Church was so strong that many people, when seeing us in the street, spit at us or threw stones, or they changed to the other side of the sidewalk so as not to run into us. Four members who had been baptized even stopped attending because they received daily visits from the priests, telling them of all the condemnation that would come upon them for changing their religion. They even got them to burn the Books of Mormon that we had given to them.

At this time, a young man arrived named Sabin Mosquera. He was receiving the discussions. He had, as he is logical, some doubts, but he showed much interest in the gospel. My companion and I dedicated ourselves to taking care of this lamb with all of our love, offering him our friendship and support him in his daily tasks. (He lived alone with his mother, an older lady that he had to take care of.) Often we went to their house to help him clean or to run the errands to the store. He went every Sunday to the chapel. At that time, we only had sacrament meeting because the attendance was very low. Nevertheless, my companion and I decided to begin Sunday school classes and priesthood. The first two Sundays, only the missionaries attended the classes because we did not have investigators, and the members that attended generally went after sacrament meeting because most of them had to work.

When Sabin decided to be baptized, something told me that things were going to change and something did. My first impression was to call him as assistant of missionary work. (I couldn’t call him as mission leader because he didn’t hold the Melchizedek priesthood yet, and my president advised me to give him a little time before ordaining him to it.) Nevertheless, his contribution as assistant of missionary work served much because he took upon himself the responsibility to visit all the members that had been baptized and ask them to return to the church, and his work brought forth fruits quickly. The first two Sundays after his baptism, we saw that the attendance had increased to thirteen people, including the friends of Sabin, and soon to 32. In a little while we had 45 people in Sacrament meeting, even though the number seemed small, for us, it was a true miracle.

Not only the enthusiasm of Sabin helped us enter the homes of many people, but as missionaries we had to ingratiate ourselves in order to open not only the doors but the hearts of the people. My companion and I decided that before speaking to people about the Church we would make them laugh, to gain their confidence. It was like this on several opportunities knocking on the doors. We took off our nametags and we told them a joke or imitated a commercial or we sang. (It was funny to listen to my companion to sing with his 100% North American accent.) The people began to see us like normal human beings. (The problem was that the priests had said on the radio that we were children of Lucifer and that we had come to kidnap their children to sell them to the U.S.A.) Once we earned the confidence of the people, we could speak to them of the gospel and to offer them the Book of Mormon.

Once, we were traveling in a cart for hire (public transportation) and there was a radio program with the Catholic priests called “God has Voice.” Just at the moment in which we were getting in the car, the priest was speaking of the Mormons, relating all kinds of barbarism, including that our intentions were to have the spouses of the men and to spy on their movements to report them to the government of the U.S.A. When the driver saw us through the rear view mirror, he turned off the radio and stopped the car. I bacame nervous because I felt the eyes of all the people on us. My companion was spared a moment of this feeling because he did not know what was happening until the driver asked us our opinion of what the priest was saying. With much serenity we began to speak about our beliefs, and we gave our testimonies of the gospel and the Spirit was so strong that we ended up teaching part of the first discussion to a group of people within the car. Many of them began to attend church (although they did not all get to baptized, and many did nothing, but they supported the work with all their love.) With these actions and the aid of Sabin (and other members that opened their hearts and left their fears), we could raise the work in Carora. As branch president I began to have interviews with the members, and it was funny because many non-members also wanted to be interviewed by me. I told them that they did not have to be interviewed, but the Spirit made me feel that if I they wanted to, it would maintain their spirituality and help the non-members fulfill the commandments.

At the end of February of 1989, there were disturbances in the country, many businesses were sacked by hungry people (the economic situation of Venezuela was every bad at that time). As missionaries, we had orders to remain in our houses, but my responsibilities as branch president caused that I went out to visit the members and to offer words of support for them. I was worried because I believed that many of them had participated in the sacking of the businesses. (The majority of the members were very poor people). But to my surprise and relief, their behavior was exemplary, none became involved in any illegal act; although they were tempted. That caused me to kneel and offered my heart in penance to have such fears.

I presided over the Carora Branch for five months. During that time I changed companions, celebrated the Mothers’ Day with a special celebration for all the mothers of the branch, assigned the youth to put on a talent show and invite their non-member friends to support them. Even though I did not have the opportunity to teach many to discussions during the last weeks before being transferred, my companion and I dedicated ourselves to organize the branch. We requested from the district all the instructive materials that we needed to enable us to train the members. We organized the Relief Society with a complete presidency. We organized to the young women with a president, and we organized the primary with a president and an advisor. I ordained Sabin Mosquera to the Melchizedek priesthood.

When I received the news that I would be transferred, I made a summary of all that we had done. The Lord had miraculously blessed us with 32 baptized and confirmed members, an average attendance of 50 people every Sundays, an organized Relief Society, a working young women’s program, a working primary and missionary work functioning with an enthusiastic young man. Two years later, he left on his mission, the first full-time missionary from Carora. When I remember those days a knot comes to my throat because an inexperienced person as I, with so many fears, could be used by the Lord to help it in his work. Missionary work fortified my testimony of the church, and it made me see that for the Lord nothing is impossible, as long as his children have the faith and the confidence sufficient in Him to move mountains.


Brother Manning,

Here I am sending you part of my experience in the mission. Excuse that it is a little long, but I am journalist and when I begin to write I cannot stop. I have other stories that come to my mind, but I did not want to tell them to you because this appears to me to be sufficiently long. If you wish, I can continue writing to you on the history of the Venezuela Maracaibo Mission the part of history that I lived myself). Thanks for inviting me to remember those times.

Greetings,
Salvador Nania


February 17, 2002
Erin,

The [preceeding] is the story that I promised you previously. This story does not have anything to do with the histories that I have compiled, but it is very interesting and exciting anyway. It is told with the same power that one finds anywhere the servants of the Lord go when they walk with the Holy Spirit.

With much esteem,

Alan Manning


Los primeros días en Carora
por Salvador
Nania
Gracias a Alan Manning por mandar esta historia a web master, 17 de febrero del 2002.


A finales de 1988 el Presidente Robert P. Lee (presidente de la Misión Maracaibo Venezuela para aquel entonces) da su permiso para abrir el area de Carora, un pueblo ubicado a dos horas de Barquisimeto, capital del Estado Lara (a cinco horas de Maracaibo). Un grupo entusiasta de cuatro misióneros entre ellos Elder Ramirez y Elder Monk (lamentablemente no recuerdo los nombres de los otros dos) fueron los elegidos por el Presidente Lee para iniciar la obra de la predicacion del Evangelio. Los cuatro primeros meses fueron difíciles para los misióneros debido a la dureza de corazon de los habitantes de Carora. Las falsas tradiciones mezcladas con los "consejos" de los curas católicos de no permitir la entrada de estos jóvenes a sus casas, hicieron cuesta arriba la predicacion.

Aun así en cinco meses pudieron bautizar a 7 personas, pioneras de la iglesia en esa parte de Síon. No tengo muchos detalles de la manera como aceptaron el Evangelio, pero sé de sus conversiones durante el tiempo que estuve como Presidente de la Rama. En Enero de 1989, el Presidente Lee me dio la asignacion de trabajar como Presidente de la Rama de Carora, estaba nervioso porque me toco la tarea de organizar la iglesia como una rama y sentía que tenía poca experiencia, apenas tres meses en el campo misional, pero el Señor nunca da mandamientos sin antes preparar la vía para que podemos cumplir con lo que el ha mandado. Adicional a la carga de presidir una rama con mi poca experiencia, el presidente me dió la asignacion de entrenar a un misionero recién llegado de los Estados Unidos, el Elder Fuller, un joven entusiasta pero con muy pocos conocimientos del español.

Lo primero que me encontré fue una enorme oposicion por parte de la iglesia Católica. Éramos 6 misioneros, aparte de mi compañero y yo estaban, Elder Bean y Elder Reyes, y Elder Monk como lider de distrito) y Elder Furman. Fue tan fuerte la oposicion de la iglesia católica que muchas personas al vernos en la calle nos escupían o tiraban piedras o se cambiaban de acera para no toparse con nosotros. Incluso 4 de los que se habían bautizado dejaron de asistir porque recibían visitas diarias de los curas, diciendoles toda la condenacion que se les venía encima por cambiarse de religion, incluso llegaron a quemarles los Libros de Mormon que les habíamos obsequidos.

Para el tiempo que llegue un joven llamado Sabin Mosquera. Estaba recibiendo las charlas, tenía como es lógico algunas dudas, pero mostraba mucho interes en el evangelio. Mi compañero y yo nos dedicamos a cuidar de esta oveja con todo nuestro amor, brindandole nuestra amistad y apoyandolo en sus tareas diarias (el vivía solo con su mamá, una señora mayor por quien tenía que velar), a menudo ibamos a su casa a ayudarlo a limpiar o hacer los mandados en la bodega. El iba todos los domingos a la capilla. En ese entonces teníamos solamente la reunión sacramental porque la asistencia era muy baja, sin embargo, mi compañero y yo decidimos empezar las clases de la escuela dominical y del sacerdocio. Los dos primeros domingos las clases las recibíamos los mismos misióneros porque no teníamos investigadores y los miembros que asistían generalmente se iban despúes de la sacramental porque la mayoría de ellos tenían que trabajar.

Cuando Sabin decidió bautizarse algo me dijo que las cosas iban a cambiar y así fue. La primera impresión que tuve fue llamarlo como asistente de la obra misiónal (no podia llamarlo lider misiónal porque todavía no tenía el sacerdocio de Melquisedec y mi presidente me aconsejo que le diera un poco de tiempo antes de otorgarselo). Sin embargo, su contribución como asistente a la obra misiónal sirvió de mucho porque él se tomo la responsabilidad de visitar a todos los miembros que hasta ese momento se habian bautizado para hacerlos regresar a la iglesia, y su trabajo brindio frutos rapidamente. Los dos primeros domingos despúes de su bautismo vimos como la asistencia había aumentado a trece personas, incluyendo los amigos de Sabin, y luego a 32. Hubo un momento que llegamos a tener 45 personas en la reunion sacramental, aún cuando el número pareciera poco, para nosotros, era un verdadero milagro.

No solo el entusiasmo de Sabin nos ayudó a entrar en las casas de muchas personas, sino que como misióneros tuvimos que ingeniarnosla para abrir no solo las puertas, sino los corazones de los caroreños. Mi compañero y yo decidimos que antes de hablar de la iglesia les haríamos risa con las personas, para ganarnos su confianza. Fue asi como en varias oportunidades tocabamos las puertas, nos quitabamos nuestras placas y les contabamos algun chiste o imitabamos un comercial de moda o incluso, cantabamos. (Era cómico escuchar a mi compañero cantar con su acento 100% norteamericano). Las personas comenzaron a vernos como seres humanos normales. (El problema era que los curas habían dicho por radio que eramos hijos de Lucifer y que veníamos a secuestrar a los niños para venderlos a los EEUU). Una vez que nos ganabamos la confianza de las personas pasabamos a hablarles del evangelio y a obsequiarles un Libro de Mormon.

En una oportunidad estabamos viajando en un carrito por puesto (transporte público) y había en la radio un programa de los curas católicos llamado Dios tiene Voz. Justo en el momento en que nos estabamos montando, el cura estaba hablando de los mormones, diciendo cualquier barbaridad, entre ellas que nuestra intención era quedarnos con las esposas de los hombres y espiar sus movimientos para reportarlos al gobierno de los EEUU. Cuando el chofer nos vío a traves del espejo retrovisor, apago la radio y detuvo el carro. Yo me puse nervioso porque sentí las miradas de todas las personas sobre nosotros. Mi compañero estuvo ajeno por un momento de este sentimiento porque no se dio cuenta de lo que estaba pasando hasta que el chofer nos preguntó que opinabamos de lo que el cura estaba diciendo. Con mucha serenidad empezamos hablar sobre nuestras creencias y dimos nuestros testimonios del evangelio y el Espíritu fue tan fuerte que terminamos enseñando parte de la primera charla a un grupo de personas dentro de un carro por puesto. Muchas de ellas comenzaron a asistir a la iglesia (aunque no todas llegaron a bautizarse en aquel entonces y muchas no lo hicieron nunca, pero apoyaron la obra con todo su amor) Con estas acciones, más la ayuda de Sabin (y luego de otros miembros que abrieron sus corazones y dejaron sus miedos), pudimos levantar la obra en Carora. Como presidente de rama comencé hacer entrevistas a los miembros y era cómico porque muchos no miembros tambien querían ser entrevistados por mí. Yo les decía que no tenían que someterse a una entrevista, pero el Espíritu me hizo sentir que si quería mantener la espiritualidad debía ayudar a los no miembros a cumplir con los mandamientos.

A finales de febrero de 1989 hubo disturbios en el país, muchos negocios fueron saqueados por personas hambrientas (la situacion económica de Venezuela era cada vez peor). Como misióneros se nos ordeno permanecer en nuestras casas, pero mi deber como presidente de rama hizo que saliera a visitar a los miembros y ofrecerles unas palabras de aliento. Estaba preocupado porque creí que muchos de ellos hubieran participado en los saqueos a los negocios (la mayoria de los miembros eran personas muy pobres). Pero para mi sorpesa y alívio, el comportamiento de ellos fue ejemplar, ninguno se involucro en ningún acto ilícito a pesar de que estuvieron tentados. Eso hizo que me arrodillara y ofreciera mi corazon en penitencia por tener tales temores.

Yo estuve cinco meses presidiendo la Rama Carora, durante ese tiempo me cambiaron de compañero, celebramos el Dia de las Madres con una fiesta especial para todas las mamás de la rama, pusimos a los jóvenes hacer un show de talentos e invitamos a sus amigos no miembros a que nos apoyaran. Aún cuando no tuve la oportunidad de enseñar muchas charlas durante las últimas semanas antes de ser cambiado, mi compañero y yo nos dedicamos a organizar la rama para pedir del distrito todos los materiales e instructivos que necesitabamos para capacitar a los miembros. Organizamos la Sociedad de Socorro con una presidencia completa, organizamos a las mujeres jóvenes con una presidenta y organizamos la primara con una presidenta y una consejera. Le otorgue el sacerdocio de Melquisedec a Sabin Mosquera y le extendi el llamamiento de lider misiónal, lo unico que no pudimos organizar fue el quorum de elderes por falta de sacerdocio.

Cuando recibí la notificación que había sido cambiado hice un resumen de todo cuanto habíamos hecho y el Señor milagrosamente nos bendijo con 32 miembros bautizados y confirmados, una asistencia promedio de 50 personas todos los domingos, la Sociedad de Socorro organizada, las mujeres jóvenes y primaria trabajando y la obra misiónal funcionando con un joven entusiasta que dos años más tarde salió a su misión, siendo el primer misiónero de regla de Carora. Cuando recuerdo esos dias un nudo se me hace en la garganta porque una persona inexperta como yo y con tantos temores pudo ser utilizado por el Señor para ayudarlo en su obra. La obra misiónal fortaleció mi testimonio de la iglesia y me hizo ver que para el Señor no hay nada imposible, siempre y cuando sus hijos tengamos la fe y la confianza suficiente en Él para mover las montañas.


Hermano Manning,

Aquí le envío parte de mi experiencia en la misión. Disculpe que sea un poco larga pero yo soy periodista y cuando empiezo a escribir no puedo parar. Tengo otras historias que vienen a mi mente pero no quise contarselas porque esta me parecio suficientemente larga, si desea, puedo seguir escribiendole mas sobre la historia de la Misión Maracaibo (la parte de la historia que yo viví en carne propia). Gracias por permitirme recordar esos tiempos.

Saludos

Salvador Nania


el 17 de febrero del 2002

Erin,

Lo siguiente es el relato que le prometí anteriormente. Este cuento no tiene nada que ver con las historias que he recopilado pero de todos modos es muy intersante y emocionante. Cuenta con el mismo poder que se encuentra en cualquier lado que vayan los siervos del Señor que andan con el Espíritu Santo.

Con mucho aprecio,

Alan Manning
Erin Send Email
 
Home
divider
Alumni [880]
divider
Friends/Members [65]
divider
Currently Serving [2]
divider
Presidents [15]
divider
Reunions
divider
News [6]
divider
Messages [1]
divider
Links
divider
Pictures [85]
divider
Stories [29]
divider
Polls [2]
divider
Chat
divider
Weather
divider
Comments
divider

divider
Anthem
divider
Church News
divider
Questions
divider
Gospel Library
divider
Mission Info
divider
Mormon News
divider
Just Called!
divider
Newsletters
divider
Password Help
divider
Recognitions
divider
El Nino Criollo
divider
Temple Presidents
divider

divider
Invite a friend
divider
Login
divider
Spacer Spacer
Spacer
Bottom Shadow

Home · Alumni · Friends/Members · Currently Serving · Presidents · Reunions · News · Messages · Links · Pictures · Stories · Polls · Chat · Weather · Comments

LDS Mission Network

Copyright © 2002-2016 · Erin · Admistradora · All rights reserved.

Site-in-a-Box is a service mark of LDS Mission Network. Version 2.1